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Simple WordPress PaymentsStripe is a wonderful credit card processor.

Stripe was built specifically to be easy for developers, which then makes it quite easy to use for end users.

Here's a getting-started guide for using Stripe with your WordPress site.

An Introduction to Stripe

Almost everyone is familiar with PayPal.

It's worth starting this introduction to Stripe by pointing out how different it is from PayPal.

PayPal wants to work like a bank, where they hold your money, and you use your PayPal account to pay for things.

Stripe instead merely processes credit cards, passing the money from the end users to the vendor’s bank. Stripe does indeed hold the money for about 7 days, but that’s for administrative purposes. It also allows for easy refunds if needs be.

When you create a Stripe account they ask how to connect to your bank. This usually involves your routing and account numbers.

Once that’s set up they give you some keys, both testing and live. You can use your testing keys in your application and make as many transactions as you’d like, to make sure everything is working smoothly. Then when you’re ready, you drop your live keys into your code or app preferences.

Stripe.js and Stripe Security

It’s extremely easy to process a transaction with Stripe via just about any language.

One of my favorites is used by many WordPress plugins, and is called Stripe.js. This is a Javascript implementation that actually operates directly between the end user’s browser and the Stripe transaction servers. 

One huge advantage of Stripe.js is that the end user’s credit card information is never sent to your server, making it basically impossible for someone to steal credit card information from your server. Yay security!

You’ll still want SSL on your site for many reasons, one of which is that people won’t trust your ecommerce interface if SSL isn’t there.

Stripe and WordPress

If you search the WordPress plugin repository for Stripe you’ll get 102 responses. Just about every ecommerce platform for WordPress includes a Stripe processor, and there are many plugins designed around donations or simply the exchange of money.

In principle, all these plugins interface with Stripe in the same way. You create your keys and put them into the proper Settings panel of your plugin.

In the OSTraining WordPress Video area, I’ve done a full review of the plugin WP Full Stripe Free.


About the author

Topher is an accomplished programmer, having written his own content management systems and managed some very large websites. He loves to help people and believes playing with WordPress is fun. Topher lives in Michigan, USA.